A Few of One Hundred: 2017

As this stray 2017 gets flushed away by vodka tonics and nachos, I find myself reflecting back upon the year and all its greatness. Sure, it wasn’t always wonderful, but there were some aspects of this year that I was pretty damn happy about. I mean, I read a lot …

Book Review: Don’t Live for Your Obituary by John Scalzi

John Scalzi’s Don’t Live for Your Obituary is a collection of essays–blog entries really–formed into the loose structure of a book. If you’re familiar with his Whatever blog, you’ll probably recognize a lot of material. I’m not going to go into a lot of details on individual pieces. Scalzi is a …

Review: The Trials of Solomon Parker

The Trials of Solomon Parker by Eric Scott Fischl is a “What would happen if you could go back and fix your mistakes?” book which succeeds when it breaks away from the expected pattern for such a book. Which it does. A lot. It succeeds a lot. Maybe it’s just …

City of Miracles by Robert Jackson Bennett

City of Miracles by Robert Jackson Bennett comes out May 2nd, and if you’re not reading it by May 3rd I’m going to scowl at you SO HARD. This book is a kind of James Bond fantasy but with emotionally impactful action and a whole lot of depth. Nothing wrong with pure …

The Collapsing Empire by John Scalzi

The Collapsing Empire by John Scalzi is the story of a vast interstellar civilization as it slowly learns of a coming change. Big change. After a thousand years of stability, change can be… jarring. If you’re into grand space opera sci-fi or if you read every single thing John Scalzi …

Dr. Potter’s Medicine Show by Eric Scott Fischl

Dr. Potter’s Medicine Show by Eric Scott Fischl is the kind of story you should read while chugging cheap whiskey straight from the bottle and cussing up a storm. It’s an intense ride full of alchemy, death, and violence. Sometimes it’s nice to read a book with villains who are easy …

The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

There should be more books like The Bear and the Nightingale. Lots of them. It is beautiful, and a joy to read. Maybe I’m just a sucker for fantasies packed full of myths and legends. Maybe the Russian origins of this folklore charmed me.